Hindu Statement

Its not a Religious Statement, Its a Cultural Statement!!!

An Ancient Indian Secret Society

No, am not getting into a debate on this one, this is new to me and I havent done any research on it yet to be able to talk about it. But it makes interesting read and makes you wonder, a lot of things. Would be great to know if anyone has heard about this and have any links to get more information.

Aritcle Source : The Nine Unknown Men

The Nine Unknown Men

According to occult lore, the Nine Unknown Men are a two millennia-old secret society founded by the Indian Emperor Asoka 273 BC. The legend of The Nine Unknown Men goes back to the time of the Emperor Asoka, who was the grandson of Chandragupta. Ambitious like his ancestor whose achievements he was anxious to complete, he conquered the region of Kalinga which lay between what is now Calcutta and Madras. The Kalingans resisted and lost 100,000 men in the battle. At the sight of this massacre Asoka was overcome and resolved to follow the path of non-violence.

He converted to Buddhism after the massacre, the Emperor founded the society of the Nine to preserve and develop knowledge that would be dangerous to humanity if it fell into the wrong hands. It is said that the Emperor Asoka once aware of the horrors of war, wished to forbid men ever to put their intelligence to evil uses. During his reign natural science, past and present, was vowed to secrecy. Henceforward, and for the next 2,000 years, all researches, ranging from the structure of matter to the techniques employed in collective psychology, were to be hidden behind the mystical mask of a people commonly believed to be exclusively concerned with ecstasy and supernatural phenomena. Asoka founded the most powerful secret society on earth: that of the Nine Unknown Men.

One can imagine the extraordinary importance of secret knowledge in the hands of nine men benefiting directly from experiments, studies and documents accumulated over a period of more than 2,000 years. What can have been the aim of these men? Not to allow methods of destruction to fall into the hands of unqualified persons and to pursue knowledge which would benefit mankind. Their numbers would be renewed by co-option, so as to preserve the secrecy of techniques handed down from ancient times.

Each of the Nine is supposedly responsible for guarding and improving a single book. These books each deal with a different branch of potentially hazardous knowledge. Traditionally, the books are said to cover the following subjects:

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May 25, 2009 Posted by | Historical Statement | , , , | 168 Comments

Akbar – The not so great.

We love to gloat about the great king Akbar, but are we sure that what we have studied in our “History” books is actually the truth or is it just a Story. I am a firm believer that history is written by the victors, so what we read most of the time as history surely has been tweaked in such a way as to promote some one or some ideology. Indian history is one of the best example of it.(ever heared of the Aryan Invasion Theory )

It has been agreed upon that Akbar was far more humane in his dealings with hindus, than the other Mughal rulers and other Islamic rulers in India. But when you read through the article you would be left wondering…. If this his how a “just” and “good” ruler treated hindus, what would be the state of affairs when the barbaric ones like Aurangzeb, were at the helm.

Below is the excerpts from an article about the not so great Akbar. Is shows the other side of history as it is taught in Indian schools.

Original Article : Akbar, The Great – A Tyrannical Monarch

History of India has witnessed innumerable invasions by hoards of armed marauders coming in from the west, perhaps attracted to the riches and wealth India then possessed. Apart from looting of wealth and destruction of property, the ‘aliens’ who remained, who committed grave atrocities against the local populace, and themselves, wallowing in immoral and unethical behaviour; except for one, it is said, Akbar.

Akbar’s Ancestors
Humayun, the son of Babar, was even more degenerate and cruel than his father. After repeated battles, Humayum captured his elder brother Kamran and subjected the latter to brutal torture. A detailed account is left by Humayun’s servant Jauhar and is quoted by Smith (p.20), which says, ” .. (Humayun) had little concerns for his brother’s sufferings .. One of the men was sitting on Kamran’s knees. He was pulled out of the tent and a lancet was thrust into his eyes .. Some lemon juice and salt was put into his eyes .. After sometime he was put on horseback.” One can imagine the cruelty and torture that Humayun was capable of inflicting on others when he subjected to his own brother to such atrocities. Humayun was also a slave to opium habit, engaged in excessive alcohol consumption and a lecherous degenarate when it came to women (Shelat, p.27). He is also known to have married a 14 year old Hamida Begum by force.

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May 22, 2009 Posted by | Historical Statement | , , , , | 9 Comments

The Iron Pillar of Delhi

This is an old Article on expressindia.com website. It is reproduced below. But the actual research by Dr. R. Balasubramaniam is here . Its one thing to have it as a tourist attraction, another to respect the skill of the people of ancient India. Where has that skill gone? Why are we still dependent on the west for a new invention. Why are we still in a service mode that getting into a creation mode? The answer pprobably lies in the thousand years of servitude that the people of India have gone through.

“Experts at the Indian Instituteof Technology have resolved the mystery behind the 1,600-year-old iron pillar in Delhi, which has never corroded despite the capital’s harsh weather.

Metallurgists at Kanpur IIT have discovered that a thin layer of “misawite”, a compound of iron, oxygen and hydrogen, has protected the cast iron pillar from rust.

The protective film took form within three years after erection of the pillar and has been growing ever so slowly since then. After 1,600 years, the film has grown just one-twentieth of a millimeter thick, according to R. Balasubramaniam of the IIT.

In a report published in the journal Current Science Balasubramanian says, the protective film was formed catalytically by the presence of high amounts of phosphorous in the iron—as much as one per cent against less than 0.05 per cent in today’s iron. The high phosphorous content is a result of the unique iron-making process practiced by ancient Indians, who reduced iron ore into steel in one step by mixing it with charcoal.

Modern blast furnaces, on the other hand, use limestone in place of charcoal yielding molten slag and pig iron that is later converted into steel. In the modern process most phosphorous is carried away by the slag.

The pillar—over seven metres high and weighing more than six tonnes—was erected by Kumara Gupta of Gupta dynasty that ruled northern India in AD 320-540.

Stating that the pillar is “a living testimony to the skill of metallurgists of ancient India”, Balasubramaniam said the “kinetic scheme” that his group developed for predicting growth of the protective film may be useful for modeling long-term corrosion behaviour of containers for nuclear storage applications.”

February 11, 2009 Posted by | Historical Statement, Scientific Statement | , , , | Leave a comment